Immuno-oncology

Recent evidence supports the role of the microbiome in response to cancer therapy, and specifically demonstrate the effect of the intestinal microbiome on the response to immune checkpoint inhibitors including protein/ligand 1 (PD- 1/PD-L1).

Emerging data from research in this area suggests that modulation of the intestinal microbiome may provide a novel and effective adjunct mean to augment these current anti-cancer therapeutic modalities.

Using our computational analysis and predictive capabilities we identified BMC121 & BMC127: potent rationally-designed consortia with potential to enhance immunological therapeutic responses and facilitate anti-tumor immune activity.

Program

Discovery

Preclinical

Phase 1

Phase 2

Approroach

Immuno-oncology (with ICI)

BMC121

Combination Therapy for NSCLC

BMC127

Combination Therapy for NSCLC

Biological

MDRO (Multi Drug resistant organisms)

Antibiotic Resistant Bacteria Clostridium Difficile Infection (CDI) – One of the most common hospital-acquired infections that presents a major public health challenge. The annual economic cost of CDI is $5.4Bn in the US.

Using our microbiome therapeutics platform, we are developing a small-molecule drug candidate (BMC201), designed to target the main toxin secreted by the bacterium. BMC201, is being developed as an orally available drug. Our therapeutic approach aims to relieve the effects of dysbiosis in the colonic microbiome in the setting of recurrent Clostridium difficile infection.

By targeting the CDI-secreted toxin we introduce a highly selective treatment option for the alleviation of CDI-related symptoms, which unlike the currently used treatment with antibiotics, spares the patient’s commensal intestinal microbial community.

Program

Discovery

Preclinical

Phase 1

Phase 2

Approroach

MDRO

BMC201

C difficile toxin-B

Small-molecule

GI related disorders

Microbiome-related Gastrointestinal Disorders Emerging data from epidemiologic, microbiome, and physiology research provide evidence of a linkage between alterations in the intestinal microbiome and several chronic GI diseases.

The growing understanding that the intestinal microbiota plays a role in GI biochemical, immunological and physiological functions has led to the increased interest in targeting the intestinal microbiota for treatment of GI disorders. However, the currently used interventions including antibiotics, prebiotics, probiotics, and fecal microbiome transplant (FMT) have not shown consistent beneficial effects. Biomica is focusing on two microbiome driven GI disorders, inflammatory bowel diseases (IBD) and functional GI and motility disorders (e.g., irritable bowel syndrome).

Using our computational predictive biology capabilities we identified BMC321 & BMC322: rationally-designed microbial consortia with potential anti-inflammatory activity in IBD.
In IBS we utilize proprietary data from several clinical trials conducted in the US to develop a novel microbiome based drug.

Program

Discovery

Preclinical

Phase 1

Phase 2

Approroach

GI related disorders

BMC321

IBD

BMC322

IBD

BMC426

IBS

Biological